Originally Posted By hannahmight

hannahmight:

Since moving to L.A. I have not met one person who writes for n+1. 

Originally Posted By unbornwhiskey

unbornwhiskey:

Last month I saw a production of Randy Newman’s Faust at New York City Center. At the time I was enduring a summer cold and received the detail of my experience in a glacial melt. The sensation of touch felt extremely surgical. This is the ideal way to walk into a circumstance of theater, to feel at any moment as if you might flow out of your skeleton into the vast silvery red of Randy Newman’s devil cape and blow your ghost nose in its moving gloss. It was this image that sustained me for two hours.

I had never seen or heard Faust before and despite viewing it from a compromised state I found it exhaustively funny and self-reflexive, as much a work of literary and music criticism as a musical itself. Newman stretched his sensibility to the aerodynamics of gospel for the songs sung by God and his angels, and shrank it back down to tidy, modest blues phrases for his own devil songs. He on more than one occasion eviscerated the limits of his own compositions, which beyond appearances are rich with chords that resolve gorgeously and intelligently. Faust, along with Newman’s entire body of work, constructs an evocative nerve between Tin Pan Alley and Ray Charles, which he populates with characters that are variously grotesque and tender. There’s a newborn quality to the most evil or deeply estranged of Newman’s characters, as if they had just recovered the tools to properly articulate their perspectives.

"Feels Like Home," sung by Vonda Shepard in the City Center production and by Bonnie Raitt in the video above, is a love song the character Martha addresses to the Devil, whom she dates briefly in one of the story’s many digressions. Even writing a straightforward love song Newman never loses his capacity for imagery and character; when Martha sings, “A window breaks / Down a long dark street / And a siren wails in the night," the seeming anonymity of her sentiment is itself broken up into vivid and gleaming fragments.

I’ve been thinking lately of the nature of “home” and what it takes to make one. I’ve never really felt at home anywhere in a geographic sense, Nevada too empty and shapeless to project anything onto, New York too dense with other projections. I’ve never successfully applied my interior design ambitions to an apartment; I either decorate too minimally or wildly overcompensate. Regardless I’ve occasionally assembled the feeling of “home” among friends with whom I’ve shared histories, enthusiasms, musical silences. When Martha sings, "Something in your eyes / Makes me want to lose myself / In your arms," I remember home as mostly an expansion of the self, a bodiless place where the self can radiate and merge unconsciously with others. From my chair in the City Center, feeling like an exposed nerve, I heard this song and watched Shepard drift warmly across the stage toward Newman’s piano, both of them meticulously assembling the feeling of the song, and I cried, sensing in my eyes in the hot gloss of tears.

Originally Posted By rendit

rendit:

I call bullshit on this supposed “article” because it fails to mention how the bartender had to straddle the gigantic chasm into hell of a perpetually open basement trapdoor just to serve you at the far end of the bar. 
Also there was lots of open space in the back!

Never go back.

rendit:

I call bullshit on this supposed “article” because it fails to mention how the bartender had to straddle the gigantic chasm into hell of a perpetually open basement trapdoor just to serve you at the far end of the bar. 

Also there was lots of open space in the back!

Never go back.

West coast #YM is having an existential crisis too, because when we moved here you could live by yourself for less than $400/month.

RIP CITY.

West coast #YM is having an existential crisis too, because when we moved here you could live by yourself for less than $400/month.

RIP CITY.

Dip it

Dip it

Originally Posted By laughingsquid

laughingsquid:

Photographer and Wikimedia Currently Fighting Over Whether a Monkey Owns a Selfie

I found ‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ to be hella problematic when you look at the history of hydroelectric power as it relates to American Colonialism. Also, the depiction of Ape society was way simplistic. And like, what’s up with the totally ‘perfect’ white liberal nuclear family heroes walking straight out of an REI catalog? But Kerri Russell is still a major hottie, so I’d still say it’s a ‘must see’.

laughingsquid:

Photographer and Wikimedia Currently Fighting Over Whether a Monkey Owns a Selfie

I found ‘Dawn of the Planet of the Apes’ to be hella problematic when you look at the history of hydroelectric power as it relates to American Colonialism. Also, the depiction of Ape society was way simplistic. And like, what’s up with the totally ‘perfect’ white liberal nuclear family heroes walking straight out of an REI catalog? But Kerri Russell is still a major hottie, so I’d still say it’s a ‘must see’.

Originally Posted By markbaumer

markbaumer:

"Scarecrone" by Melissa Broder

"Still blogging, huh?"

markbaumer:

"Scarecrone" by Melissa Broder

"Still blogging, huh?"

(via hannahmight)

Originally Posted By 3dprintmeafucktogive

3dprintmeafucktogive:

Tenth street anatomy lesson.

It would be a phallusy to cross that line.

3dprintmeafucktogive:

Tenth street anatomy lesson.

It would be a phallusy to cross that line.

Man was created in 9/11’s image

Man was created in 9/11’s image

Now she’s the only one who always inhales.Paris is stale and it’s war if we fail.

Originally Posted By usernameninetynine

usernameninetynine:

If I had more time, I’d marco up a screenshot of a iPhone game call ‘Page View Whore’ — you would be an aspiring writer blogger who wants to be famous and you would complete a series of repetitive tasks: writing a trend piece for a third tier blog three days too late, doing a ‘reading’ a coffee shop in quirklyn, tweeting at bloggers just slightly more famous than yourself. The boss battle would be doing a profile of Kim Kardashian, in which you have to make appropriately snarky asides, signaling that you are above your subject, still able to fling witty arrows at her while standing on her shoulders.

http://0-media-cdn.foolz.us/ffuuka/board/tg/image/1341/69/1341696054684.png

All politics is local anesthesia.

All politics is local anesthesia.

Originally Posted By dopemove

dopemove:

Working on my novel

If you don’t live in New York, you probably won’t get this?

dopemove:

Working on my novel

If you don’t live in New York, you probably won’t get this?


The computer lords want to control everything, and central to controlling all things is controlling perception. Perception of the way things are, the way things work, and what’s happened in history so that they can frame their version of events and control the narrative; mind-controlling the masses to make them into better, more compliant consumers.
Just as governments spend enormous sums of money on textbooks, monuments, films, and museums which heroize themselves and frame their particular version of history, the computer overlords are concerned about the myths of the culture. Their ascendency must seem inevitable, brilliant, brave, noble, just, and right. The “stuff” that the hoarder retains might, however, just tell a story, which refutes or challenges their version of events in some way.
The record collection or magazine or newspaper might reveal some clue to a social movement or trend or fashion or sensibility that defies their moronic stranglehold on consciousness. A burp of resistance. A clue to a way out. A signal that life doesn’t actually depend on high-speed internet access. And the physicality of the item infers that things meant something once, that everything wasn’t always a senseless, equivocal post on Tumblr.

All Power to the Pack Rats by Ian Svenonius

The computer lords want to control everything, and central to controlling all things is controlling perception. Perception of the way things are, the way things work, and what’s happened in history so that they can frame their version of events and control the narrative; mind-controlling the masses to make them into better, more compliant consumers.

Just as governments spend enormous sums of money on textbooks, monuments, films, and museums which heroize themselves and frame their particular version of history, the computer overlords are concerned about the myths of the culture. Their ascendency must seem inevitable, brilliant, brave, noble, just, and right. The “stuff” that the hoarder retains might, however, just tell a story, which refutes or challenges their version of events in some way.

The record collection or magazine or newspaper might reveal some clue to a social movement or trend or fashion or sensibility that defies their moronic stranglehold on consciousness. A burp of resistance. A clue to a way out. A signal that life doesn’t actually depend on high-speed internet access. And the physicality of the item infers that things meant something once, that everything wasn’t always a senseless, equivocal post on Tumblr.

All Power to the Pack Rats by Ian Svenonius

please if you are boring person stay away from me

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